Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Making Mine Scenery Part XI


Greetings! If you're a first time visitor or someone who's been following the series, thank you for reading. My apologies to anyone who came looking on Sunday for the latest scenery post and found none. It was a busy and stressful weekend so I fell off schedule. That being said, we're back on track with our Sun/Wed schedule, so here it goes. As might be expected, this one is very picture heavy.
  

This is where we left off with the freight elevator car in Making Mine Scenery X. As promised, I worked on detailing it out. Today we'll add some additional rails/bumpers, signage, and the elevator control box which is where we are going to start.  


The sunlight was so strong you can't see the hole I drilled, but I had cut a piece of StripeStyrene tube about 3/16" (about the width of 3 pieces of 1/16" rod, pictured next to it. The idea was to create a lever by gluing the rod in the hole I drilled.


Here's a shot of the rod gluing in place to make my lever.


Now the main box is a piece of plastic garbage I acquired from somewhere. It was sort of fragile so I reinforced it with some Plastruct rod pieces and an I-beam. After I glued my box in place I wanted to add a tube that would protect any wires. I put some CA glue on a piece of 1/16" rod and slid it in along the I-beam


Next I began working on putting rod along the base of the walls. With my "wire tube" in place I wanted to make it look like it belonged there and wasn't an afterthought. I used my pin vice to drill a hole at the end of this square rod, then used a blade to trim it so it would wrap around my "wire tube".


Here it is, glued in place. I was pretty proud of this so I'm going to pat myself on the back.


Next, I trimmed the rod that was extending through the box and made a cap and glued it in place.


Then I came to a realization that you'll find in industrial settings like this.  When you're rolling ore carts, dumpsters, and storage containers into this freight elevator, invariably someone is going to smash into the control box, maybe even rip it off the wall. So I added an I-beam. I cut it around the base board rod so it looks like it might have been added "after the fact".


With the mine being owned by FerrumSky, I expect their corporate logo being everywhere to reinforce their dominance or foster a brand loyalty akin to patriotism in our dystopian future. The logo is a dome with a lightning bolt so I quickly cut a sign plate and added some bolts and a lightning bolt.


Here's the sign in place, but its actually only attached with blue tack in this picture. I primed and painted it separately so I could do the dome without trying to shove my fist in the elevator car. You can also see I added a bunch of waist height rails around the car. This is pretty standard in elevators to protect the walls, acting like bumpers.


I'll spare you the details of painting the car up because they are almost the same as in Making Mine Scenery Part V, except rather than starting at Tin Bitz, I started with Boltgun Metal on Chaos Black Primer, and then darkened it up with Citadel Nuln Oil and Agrax Earthshade to make it a little more oily/drippy gross than just dirty/rusty. I also painted an arrow behind the lever to help reinforce what it is - an old tyme freight elevator control lever.


My FerrumSky logo doesn't have quite the pop I wanted, but I've got ideas on how to do that in the future. You might also note that I also used some Forgeworld Light Rust on this piece to add some additional weathering tones.


Finally, yesterday afternoon I added a "patch" to my ramp and some other details to the elevator shaft, like I-beam guides for the elevator car and some random tubes. After I completed this I started base coating and painting it up today. Coming up I need to build a door or gate for the car. I'll show that off next time. There's still a bit to go before this piece is done.



That's it for today. I'm official for AdeptiCon, so look for me in the main hall running demos on some of these mine board sections with a bunch of painted Broken Contract minis. Until next time!
-Nick

Making Mine Scenery Part I
Making Mine Scenery Part II
Making Mine Scenery Part III
Making Mine Scenery Part IV
Making Mine Scenery Part V
Making Mine Scenery Part VI
Making Mine Scenery Part VII
Making Mine Scenery Part VIII
Making Mine Scenery Part IX
Making Mine Scenery Part X

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Making Mine Scenery Part X

Things have come a long way since early play testing!

When I made my very first board sections for play testing a year ago, one of the only sections I had created that wasn't just a tunnel, was the freight elevator. I envision the mines having multiple ways out, some being more convenient than others. One would be to walk all the way out using winding tunnels, and likely encounter Prods and work gangs along the way. An extremely inconvenient way would be to try and escape out of the air shafts, because there has to be a way to circulate air deep down into the mines so that the workers don't asphyxiate. A common thing in mines though is to dig a vertical shaft using a hoist and then eventually install a freight elevator to move heavy equipment down, and move ore back out. One of the more consistently used dramatic action movie sequences involves "the elevator." The moments of waiting. The surprise of what might be behind the automated doors. Elevators are exciting and fun, so I had to have one.


The elevator section needed to match up with my other sections. When I did my play testing prototype last year, I used up most of the space with a long hallway. I imagine I could have done that again but depending on how the other board sections might butt up to it, I was concerned about having a wall that wouldn't fit in with the "room and pillar" mine concept. To that end, I drew out my points like I was creating a four way intersection and I put where the elevator would land in the center. I wanted to leave some space to detail the shaft so I framed it with a 1/4" border on 3 sides. The 1/4" border on the front would be for the threshold between the elevator and the door.


With my plan made, I drew out my plan on my pink foam and cut it out.


Then I built it up on offcut foam to give it the same height as the other sections I've built, but I thought the gaps/recesses would add an additional level of detail when the piece is done. This is one of those "less is more" situations where I can use less supplies to my advantage.


Next I wanted to build out my elevator cab. I started by cutting out a 4"x4" piece of foamcore for my base.


Next I cut out a 4"x4" piece of tread plate plastic card. I cut it "inside the lines" to ensure it was slightly smaller than the piece of foamcore it will sit on.


As you can see, there is a faint white border around the piece.


Somewhere along the way I acquired this thick type of PVC board called "sintra". I used a couple of off cuts I had to build my walls. I used wood glue to bind it to the foamcore base, but used CA glue to glue the sintra pieces together. I also added a couple of girders in the corners to give it a little more strength. These were also glued with CA glue.


Now, with the base of the elevator raising the height of the elevator floor, I needed to raise the entryway as well. I took a few foamcore off cuts (I love my off cuts!) and cut them to 2 1/4". I drew a line at the 2" mark and then cut at a diagonal the remaining 1/4" to get a tiny ramp. Then I glued 2"x4" tread plate across the top to hold them all together.


Next I used wood glue to drop a 1/2" tread plate ramp down to transition from the floor to the elevator. In "real life" its not the most practical design, but when I worked in moving I encountered it. Ramps. Weird lips that acted more like speed bumps. They were all there.

The open topped dumpster I made out of a Wreck-Age
Shipping Container and Plastruct.

Before I wrap up for today I wanted everyone to see how much "freight" this freight elevator can haul. I wanted to make sure it could hold two Wreck-Age Shipping Containers and still hold a model on a 25mm round base, and it can.

The next stage is to shape the rocks into the foam, and since we've already covered that in detail we'll come back to this piece on Sunday when I add more details and paint it up. I'm always eager to hear from those of you out there reading this, so please leave your comments, questions, suggestions, and requests! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and let us know what you think. On a final note, we got 4 new prototypes in the mail yesterday and I'm very excited to get them cleaned up and ship them off for casting. I hope you like them! Thanks for reading.
-Nick

Officer Tulson, Nells Turnbull, Officer Moerta, and Ari Gaylen.

Making Mine Scenery Part I
Making Mine Scenery Part II
Making Mine Scenery Part III
Making Mine Scenery Part IV
Making Mine Scenery Part V
Making Mine Scenery Part VI
Making Mine Scenery Part VII
Making Mine Scenery Part VIII
Making Mine Scenery Part IX

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Assembling the Cast - Will Kollis

Will Kollis - Breaker Crew Leader
Concept Art by Geng Gendall.
     Kollis worked a number of different contracts before he ended up in the FerrumSky mines, though he rarely brings up his past. He carries himself with a thoughtful confidence and props up his crew with wisdom and positive reinforcement. Many crew leaders got to their position by towing the company line and sympathizing with the whims of the Executives, but he earned his position by garnering the respect of his peers.
     Though respected by his crew, he is not a favorite among the Prods. Crew leaders are expected to help ensure the crews are compliant but Kollis consistently defends their health and safety. This has earned him a reputation of being difficult by causing the Prods consistent frustration. His muscled arms and lean physique bear faded scars of numerous beatings he's received for insubordination. The effectiveness of his crews is the only reason he has not met with an early retirement by beating or staged accident. Should his willfulness become more than his success can balance out it may be a very interesting day as fear wages a war against loyalty in the hearts of his crew.

Will Kollis (The Reluctant Leader)
Core: Actions: 3 Move: 3 Wounds: 3
Combat: Shoot: 5 Melee: 4 Strength: 5 Agility: 5
Brain: Intellect: 5 Perception: 5 Psyche: 5 Medic: 5
Social: Lead: 5 Dealing: 6
Intangible: Recovery: 6 Faith: 6

Equipment: Sledge Hammer, Breather
Skills: Inspirational Leader

Inspirational Leader: Once per Turn use 1AP and take a Leadership Test to give a friendly Character within 8" an additional Action Point until the end of the Turn. Initiative is unaffected by this Action Point.

By Nick Baran. Edited by Rob Ferrick.

Sunday, February 15, 2015

Making Mine Scenery Part IX


Greetings terrain builders! On this Valentine's Day weekend I'm going with a quick and simple project: rock piles. Rock piles are a thematic addition to the mine setting and can be extremely useful for game play as barriers and cover to hide behind. Plus, they're a great way to reduce your terrain making "waste."


First I began with some offcuts, a few 25mm round bases, and my breakaway blade. Personally, I hate waste. I try to get the most out of everything I can. Our hobby isn't exactly the most environmentally sound hobby out there so I try to reduce my impact by using most of my off cuts for other projects. I maintain a bin of off cuts of various sizes and most of the terrain made in this series has all been made from pieces in that bin saved from previous scenery projects.


I cut up and shaped the offcuts into rocks of various sizes and shapes using the same techniques I did for the mine walls detailed in Making Mine Scenery Part II.


I built these up into small pillars of large stones and glued them all together with wood glue. We'll get back to these in a bit.


With some tall piles done, now I wanted a pile of rubble, or maybe a section where the roof collapsed. I started this piece with a small offcut of 1/8" hardboard that was a little over 4" wide and I whittled the edges until it fit neatly in my roughly 4" wide mine corridors.


Like the tall rock piles, I shaped my foam off cuts and deliberately stacked them in a haphazard way that made the center the high point that the rocks were built up to, or represent the closest point to where these rocks fell from. Next I used a crappy old brush and painted glue on the base and any exposed areas of the top of the 25mm bases and then dipped the bases in play sand.


I let the glue dry for a while and when the foam and sand felt dry and secure I painted everything Citadel Scorched Brown in two successive coats.


Once these basecoats were done I went through all of the stages of drybrushing from Making Mine Scenery Part I and Making Mine Scenery Part III to make them blend in.



Here's a couple model eye view shots of the rock piles in use.


And finally an overhead view. These are quick and simple ways to use up some of that pink foam and hardboard waste you invariably have laying around, and it makes functional barriers for game play. Here are links to the rest of the series for your perusal. Like us on the Broken Contract Facebook and Twitter, and keep following us here! Thanks for reading.
-Nick

Making Mine Scenery Part I
Making Mine Scenery Part II
Making Mine Scenery Part III
Making Mine Scenery Part IV
Making Mine Scenery Part V
Making Mine Scenery Part VI
Making Mine Scenery Part VII
Making Mine Scenery Part VIII

Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Making Mine Scenery Part VIII


Its Wednesday! And that means its terrain time again. For those tuning in now, we've been working on a straight mine tunnel section with an adjustable height hydraulic blast door.We built this piece of scenery in Making Mine Scenery Part VI and focused on the door in Making Mine Scenery Part VII. Where we left off on Sunday was here:


At This point the door was complete and the basic drybrushing had been done on the walls. But the "iron mine" specific drybrushing from Making Mine Scenery Part III had not been done yet. I went through those stages, getting the piece to here:


This is the true starting point for today. All of the drybrushing has been completed. Now its time to work on the treadplate. Harkening back to my love of Necromunda when it came out in 1995, I have a thing for "caution stripes". These very dangerous hydraulic doors definitely need caution stripes.


I began by painting the treadplate Abaddon Black. This is going to mute my yellows slightly, but that's okay. These caution stripes get trampled on day in and day out.


Next I used Macharius Solar Orange to draw diagonal lines with my brush.You can see that on the left hand side of this photo. I then filled in every other line grouping with Macharius Solar Orange in two successive coats. You can see this taking shape on the right hand side of the photo.


With my basecoat down, I hit the orange areas with highlights of Golden Yellow and Sunburst Yellow. I then did a more subtle highlight of the black areas with Adeptus Battle Grey. Of course, this looks way too bright for the type of setting that Broken Contract takes place it.


To dirty it up I stippled and drybrushed Boltgun Metal and Chainmail to mute everything and give the sense that the paint would be worn off of the raised areas of the treadplate.


With the treadplate complete, I finished the door in the same way I did the steel panels in Making Mine Scenery Part V, complete with rust drips.


I also weathered the door and caution stripes with  bit of Forgeworld Aged Rust weathering powder to complete the look.


Here's a model eye view of several mine sections lined up in a row.


And here's that same shot from above, with my TV controller that I forgot to remove from the shot for some reason. The TV wasn't even on.

Reader David Koszka asked on Facebook how many sections I'm going to do. Well, the reason I am doing these articles every Sunday and Wednesday up until AdeptiCon is so that I have something to demonstrate the game with there. Running a quick demo will only need 2-3 sections, but I want to be able to showcase various aspects of the game. I'm actually figuring out how to represent things as I go. I thought, "Wow. I bet people would dig having to jump or run across a chasm, that showcases the sense of high adventure right?" so then I sought to represent that on the table top. Adjustable height doors took some time and failed attempts to get right. The goal is to keep at it until I have a handful of really cool themed pieces to demo the game with next March at the big show, so we'll be learning and exploring together until then.

Thanks for reading! Keep the comments, questions, and suggestions coming. Is there a high adventure action sequence you'd love to see represented on the tabletop? Maybe I can make it happen. Follow Broken Contract on Facebook and Twitter and check out our first castings and new 3D renders showcased yesterday. Here's a glimpse! Thanks all. -Nick


Making Mine Scenery Part I
Making Mine Scenery Part II
Making Mine Scenery Part III
Making Mine Scenery Part IV
Making Mine Scenery Part V
Making Mine Scenery Part VI
Making Mine Scenery Part VII